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urgeent. u.s. and allied forces firing on libya igniting the biggest international military effort since the iraq war. this is a special edition of the fox report. new images showing u.s. navy ships firing missiles at qaddafi air defenses and teeping up with britain,itiny and canada all to support a rebel uprising in that country. it appears on the verge of defeat. secretary of state hillary clinton said left unchecked qaddafi will commit unspeakable atrocities . the first shots coming from french fighter jets. a plane shot down over the outskirts of benghazi bursting in flames . crashed and sending thick black smoke in the sky. rebels, cheering and celebrating as international forces move in tryying to protect them. so far 112 cruz missiles launched near tripoli. we have fox news team coverage on the ground . mike emanuel is traveling with the president in brazil and steve first in tripoli. steve, any reaction from qaddafi to the air trikes? >>reporter: john, what we heard from qaddafi in the past several days. one of defiance and he said he will retaliate against military or civilian t
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
of trading on a legal tip-off, now the biggest insider trading trial in u.s. history. police investigate an organized crime syndicate that operated around the world. hello there as forces step up offenses against rebel areas, president obama's top national security advisors meet to outline what steps are realistic. washington as underscored any authorization of a no-fly zone must come from a united nation security council. >> colnel kadafi presented a front since the rebellion in his country began and more evidence of the fighting that split libya. these pictures show the situation a few days ago. government troops showing off flashes of what they claim is rebel held a&m mission. rebel forces say the situation in the city is very critical with fierce battles taking place. >> i don't think we can stand aside to let that happen. >> this british approach is something one prominent american politician has welcomed. >> a no-fly zone account be imposed fairly easily, not without challenges, but i would also point out that the air assets that gadhafi has is in a small space. a no-fly zone is wh
after the killing of u.s. immigration agent in mexico. american agents cannot legally carry guns south of the border. at today's news conference near president said that should change. each points out the americans are there in a support role and not as law enforcement officers as well. both presidents promised to do more to protect u.s. agents working in mexico. >> i assure you that we will be examining all our procedures and protocols in terms of how our agents travel throughout mexico and we will be working in close contact with mexican law enforcement, who i'm sure will have important advice in terms of how we operate in that region. >> shepard: and now there has been a gruesome killing on this side of the border. experts call it a first for mexican drug lords. and cops say the cartels are trying to send a very clear message right here in the united states. that message and the rest of the day's news coming up from the journalists of fox news tonight on "the fox report." are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? the experts at imperial
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
the previous day. u.s. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has indicated america's economy is growing at a faster pace than last year but he cautions over soaring oil prices over continuing soaring prices in the arab world. >> sustained rises in the price 0 of oil and other commodities will be a threat to overall growth and price stability. >> reporter: bernanke submitted the policy report to congress on tuesday. he said commodity prices are high due to growing demand in emerging economies. referring to the current economic situation in the u.s., bernanke said there is increased evidence that a self sustaining recovery in consumer and business spending may be taking hold. he added the risk of deflation has become negligent libl. he said it could be several years before the unemployment rate returns to a normal level. noting the housing sector remains exception ally weak. he stressed the deed to ease monetary measures. >>> the european ministry has updated the forecast for the euro zone. they said the latest forecast of 1.6% growth this year is 0.1 percentage points higher than predict
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
and the point ready gaining against the u.s. dollar.the dolldollar. the dollar falling against the japanese yen. >> the waenger yen helped give japanese stocks a boost. the nikkei in tokyo is up. most of the major markets have finished the session higher. in shanghai, the market rose after new manufacturing data showed there may not be a need for any immediate tightening measures. two straight surveys showed china's manufacturing growth slowed in february but still remained at a healthy level. beijing's official purchasing managers index slipped slightly to 52.2 last month. that's down from 52.9 in january. >>> and hsbc's february pmi reading fell to a seven-month low of 51.7, down from 54.5 in january. any figure above 50 signals growth. >>> well, shares of hspc fell more than 5% in hong kong trade as asia got its first chance to react to the company's full-year earnings. the company's results were released after the close on monday. its profit more than doubled from the previous year to $13.2 billion. but, here's the key, it's still missed expectations. it's pre-tax profit came in at $19 bill
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
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for nato to take on the broader civilian protection mission, unrest lose 1973. >> sean: the u.s. will continue to lead the allied effort against gadhafi and the regime until transfer of power is complete. u.s. warplanes will continue strike missions. for the latest on the ground we go to steve harrigan live in tripoli. >> reporter: sean, for the sixth night in a row we've had more strikes and counterattacks. two loud explosions coming five hours ago. apparently, a military barracks east of tripoli was the target. anti-aircraft fire pup in the air, red tracer bullets filling the sky from mobile guns in the back of pick-up trucks in different parts around the city. a long shot for them to hit any of the jets in the sky. as far as the fighter jets, today a french jet knocked down the first libyan plane to try and violate that no-fly zone destroying that plane. finally, a battle is shaping up which will test these new rebel forces since they've gotten help from coalition airstrikes that battle is shaping up. rebel numbers are growing outside the city. they are armed large with rocke
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
community to step in are bothering to show up. this is u.s. taxpayer finding out how much they are paying. pentagon saying it is spending $55 million a day on bombs and missiles alone. analysts say if arab member dozen not want to play though and pay. i don't hear them volunteering on either count. what do you make of that? >>guest: look at the history of the arab and muslim world the last 20 years. with violent dictatorships, saddam in 1991, invading an arab neighbor, saddam hussein in 2003 and iran developing nuclear weapons which i can tell you i talked to arab government officials off the record and they are petrified of a nuclear iran. so why don't arab nations lead the charge against iran's nuclear weapons program? >>neil: what i am wandering is the participation, your participation early, as so many beg off. the arab league as a block voted together with libya being a member, being suspended, for the action, yet, few participating in it, and, in fact, outside of humanitarian show purposes, virtually no one and there is a big meeting in london to talk about it, only a third of the m
interview with former secretary of state, madeleine albright, hear what she has to say about the u.s. policy in libya. from lexus. r galld welcome to the darker side of green. see your lexus dealer. ♪ today is saturday announcer: 60 minutes of physical activity a day and eating well can help get your child healthy. get ideas. get involved. get going at letsmove.gov. that's letsmove.gov. >>> scenes from misurata, as the violence continues in this conflict. the air campaign against libya has depleted moammar gadhafi's arsenal but he is still defiant and still in power. earlier, i discussed the u.s. role with former secretary of state, madeleine albright. >> thank you very much for joining us. >> good to be with you, don. >> much has been made of this conflict and how the united states got involved. i have to ask you, do you think the president handled this properly and should we have intervened? >> i think he handled it very well. the reason we intervened is that terrible things were happening on the ground in libya. people were being killed. gadhafi himself had said that he was going to s
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
it every day. and then they leave. you know, is it is hard to take a city as the u.s. learned in iraq. and i think to pacify a whole town like that, may be more than they want to do right now. sometimes it seems like they're making an example of zawiyah. i don't know how much longer that can go on. >> and arwa, from your vantage point which is in benghazi, far to the east of tripoli, how organized are the opposition forces? not politically so much, because it seeps like they're getting more organized, but miltaf rily. >> they're struggling. they don't really know how to lay out a tactical battle plan. they've tried to form a military council that is meant to bring together all the various elements they have on the ground and the front line, they do realize that they don't necessarily have the upper hand when it cops to experience, training and when it comes to the weapons that they do have at their disposal, there was a few days ago, the optimism amongst leaders. it would be a fairly straightforward march toward tripoli. they're encountering a much tougher battle they had. i think a b
for debate, not action. u.s. secretary of state has insisted that this be a u.n., not american initiative. protesters are keeping a low profile in at the capitol. but the protesters still seem determined to fight. >> only 30 miles away from the wyatt, the military success makes it even more dangerous -- from zawiya, the military success makes it even more dangerous for protesters. they believe in former is are everywhere. yet another protester joined us. they have never been on facebook before, which is now blocked. they do not have weapons, unlike the rebels in zawiya. but many have died, too, killed by the regime. >> jeremy. >> do you think because of the force that he has used -- >> no, and he is not finished. i will never speak any words with -- i am not arab. >> what is your gut feeling, like your feeling inside about how this is killing two and? >> we do not want this to go on. >> so, how do you beat him? >> how we will be? with faith. that is the only way. we don't have guns or modules or anything. but we have faith. we have the faith to be free people. >> how do you sustain this?
their leaders. listen. one u.s. ally calls the situation there, quote, deteriorating rapidlyof. remember, some officials are calling yemen the new wild west for al qaeda terrorists. we'll get to all of that in a minute. >>> first, mubarak is gon in egypt. gadhafi is under siege in libya. is bashar assad next? that's the question today rumbling across the middle east because the spark of rolution s reached the arab powerhouse syria. this is damascus today.ot antigovernment protests spread to the syrian capital and beyond. here's where it started, daraa, south of damascus. believe it or not, we are told with all the arrests about a month ago, a dozenz teen sz ho it started. they were arrested for spraying antigovernment graffiti. then on wednesday, this government forces opened fire in daraa. accounts remain sketchy, but the tape we're about to watch does give us some idea. as we sa, the exact circumstances remain unclear, as do the numberof deaths. but yesterday the government conceded it made a mistake and announced new reforms. today's sponse from the sreet suggests that may not be enough. w
. is there a contradiction in what this mission is? because we've heard from u.s. officials gadhafi has lost legitimacy, they want him out, but the security council resolution talks about protecting civilians. what's the mission? >> if you talk to u.s. officials, they say the mission immediately is to stop the violence against the civilians. but then they also talk about a series of kind of stages that, in in other words, sequencing is the word they're using, one step at a time. they say okay, we're going to try to freeze his advance, especially to benghazi, and continue to tighten the noose in other ways. so they're freely admitting it make take some time to get him to step down, if he each does. i just got some new information from a senior u.s. official. we're here at the airport about to take off with hillary clinton to paris to that meeting on libya. he said that the libyans were still reaching out to the united states. in fact, the foreign minister musa kusa has been calling officials in the united states and they continue to say we're going to have a cease-fire, we're going to have a cease-fire.
for joining us. >> thank you. >> jamie: what is on the table actually for the u.s.? >> well, we could, declare a no-fly zone but that is complicated, because, while the u.s. has aircraft, in all the nate tows countries, italy and britain and germany we cannot use this aircraft unless we have permission from the host country and that is not likely to come. they've already said they will not give permission unless the u.n. or nato-wide agrees to that and that will not happen. >> jamie: going it alone -- >> we'd be in it alone and, a no fly zone is not just to say, nobody fly over lybia, what a no-fly zone would require is that u.s. aircraft, probably based on carriers, would go in to lybia and would bomb lybia and bomb the air defense system of lybia and fly 24/7 over lybia and that is a major commitment. and, also sets the precedent, what about the next revolution that you will see? because you will see more of these. and, so, the question is, could we do it? yes, we could but it is at a great cost and secondly, joe, jamie is the question, should we? now, right now, so far the libyan rebels are
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
benefit for civil society. and also give that many of these are u.s. based companies, is there a role for u.s. policy to promote the freedom to connect? >> one more from this side of the room. the way in the back. >> thank you. my name is john wooden. thank you all for your really excellent recitation. jackie, i was interested in your comment about more bottom-up development. others wonder if you could operationalize that with some examples. and also to ask whether the model of cooperatives and particular worker cooperatives can play a constructive role here? thank you. >> okay, let's come back to the panel, let him respond to this set of questions and then i think would probably have time for at least one more round in addition to that one. i think perhaps the most efficient way to do this is just simpler to start at the right and work our way across and let people select a question they would choose to enter. if any remain unanswered at the end you have to catch them at coffee after the meeting is over. >> so i will start with the doctor's comments, but maybe take it from low bit of
. >> the president saying that u.s. ground force would not be part of that effort which apparently will be led by french and british soldiers. gadhafi's government has declared a cease-fire in an apparent bid to ward off strikes but that cease-fire apparently includes reports from rebels that they are still being shelved. two cities, including misrata reportedly still under attack. rebels in the eastern stronghold of benghazi are fortifying positions against a gadhafi attack and welcoming outside attack. >> gadhafi is not good. gadhaf is very, very dangerous. >> wait for france to bring battalion for the gadhafi forces and for us staying here we're waiting for our orders to move forward. >> course this action is in sharp contrast to the western response to events in yemen let alone u.s. supported dare i say it bank rolled allies like bahrain and saudi arabia who have been using our own weapons to crack down on their own people. their efforts met with stern words of warning from our country. joining us now lieutenant colonel tony shaf fer, former intelligence officer and with us from london phi
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> more now on libya from the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rise. she spoke to reporters for about 20 minutes at the white house before the daily briefing. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. as i mentioned this morning, we have with us today the united states ambassador to the united nations susan rice and was in a meeting with the president and u.n. secretary general and i would like her to speak about that meeting and she'll take questions from you and i'll step aside. thanks. >> thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i want to give you a brief readout of the president's meeting with the u.n. secretary general. as you might expect, significant portion of that meeting was devoted to discussing the situation in libya. the u.n. has played a positive and very important role in efforts to end the bloodshed there and hold the gaddafi regime accountable and support the libyan people. in libya, the united nations is demonstrating the indispensible role it can play in advancing our interests and defending ou
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
-- the u.s. should not do this unilaterally. but at the nato summit meeting with defense ministers thursday, he needs to come out of that meeting, nato needs to come out with a plan of action that sends a clear message to gadhafi and the people around him, your days are up, the game is over. >> david, will cain here. i want to ask a question, we could be waiting on an international coalition or approval to sanction action. i've been asking this question over and over -- why would we intervene in libya, i still haven't received an answer that totally satisfies me. the most consistent one is that it would be the right thing to do because people are dying. for altruistic reasons. here's my question -- if we're looking to do the right thing, why do we need international approval to do the right thing? >> i think it's extraordinarily important especially with the president who is committed to the principles of international cooperation, collaboration, working through the u.n. i think it's extremely important that this president stick to his principles. i do think he's going to have a hard time g
't make the mistake that the u.s. made in iraq. he didn't dismantle the military completely. >> rose: he dismantled the leadership. >> and brought in a new cadre of officers. and then he did something else. gradually he built a parallel military called the islamic revoluonary guard corps, the i.r.g.c. and with every passing year he strengthened them to the dret remit of the military. so we now have two military, one that is significant. >> so tell me your picture of iran today. i mean khamenei is the supreme leader. >> khamenei is the supreme leader. i think his space of power is essentially the i.r.g.c., the revolutionary guards. >> rose: and they're more loyal to him than they are to ahmadinejad or anyone else? >> they are more loyal to themselves, i think, right now because... >> rose: they're the power center. >> they're the power center. they've become an economic juggernaut. >> rose: they own things. >> they own about half the country. literally about half of the economy. >> rose: so therefore, it is argued, that sanctions can have an impact because sanctions can deny them their so
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